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Why is:

"I and Daniel are taking him to the park"

wrong, but

"Daniel and I are taking him to the park"

isn't.

I and Daniel, no matter what the order, are both part of the subject (and him the object), so why does it matter what order the subject is in?

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    What do you mean by "talking him to the park"? Do you mean "taking him to the park"?
    – BillJ
    Jun 26, 2018 at 19:23

1 Answer 1

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It's not grammatically wrong. It's considered more polite to put yourself second.

However, you should consider sentences like

I and Daniel made a lot of mistakes on this project

to be exceptions to this rule. Here, it's probably more polite to put yourself first.

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  • Thank you! But why is I and Daniel made a lot of mistakes on this project more polite to say this than in I and Daniel are talking him to the park? Both are doing the verb..so whether it's more polite to put oneself first should be irrelevant because A and B did this, does not mean just because A is first, A is responsible.
    – Xin
    Jun 26, 2018 at 17:58
  • If it's about making mistakes then putting I first places the emphasis on yourself—you take more blame. It's the same reason that law some firms, named after partners, put the most "important" name first. It's a social convention, not one of English per se. Jun 27, 2018 at 1:00

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