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The following is an excerpt from The Japan Times of June 22. What does "It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story" mean?

The spread of misinformation ‒ "fake news" if that's more your speed ‒ has long been an issue, but social media has accelerated it significantly. It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story, where facts are scarce but the Twitter timeline moves at a rapid pace.

  • 'It is never more flagrant than ...'. – Edwin Ashworth Jun 25 '18 at 12:11
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In this case, glaring means stark, dramatic, obvious, conspicuous with the connotation of being something bad or undesirable.

According to Webster, glaring: obtrusively and often painfully obvious, as in a glaring error

So, what the author is trying to say is that when a story is first developing, there are not many available facts, and the spread of misinformation is most dramatic at that point.

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no more than macmillan

used for saying that a particular situation or result seems appropriate or normal

As used in the sentence you cited, it can be confusing, implying possible normality.

Whereas:

It's most glaring in the early hours of a developing story, where facts are scarce but the Twitter timeline moves at a rapid pace.

leaves no question.

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