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  1. The three documents were signed by each Anthony, Jack, and Mandy.

  2. Each of the three documents was signed by Anthony, Jack, and Mandy.

Do the above two sentences mean the same thing? Or does the first sentence mean that one document would be signed by Anthony, another by Jack, and another by Mandy?

If both mean the same thing, how do I say that there are three documents and each person signs one?

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    What do you mean by each Anthony? How many Anthonies do you have, or Jacks or Mandies for that matter? It sounds like they come in triples, and that you have a bunch of A/J/M triples to match up. – tchrist Jun 25 '18 at 2:42
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1. The three documents were signed by each Anthony, Jack, and Mandy.

  • This implies three documents were all signed by numerous "Anthony"s, "Jack"s, and "Mandy"s.

2. Each of the three documents was signed by Anthony, Jack, and Mandy.

  • This would mean all of the documents were signed by all three people.

In this case, I would use the word respectively instead of each, like this:

The three documents were respectively signed by Anthony, Jack, and Mandy.

or

The three documents were signed by Anthony, Jack, and Mandy, respectively.

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