0

I am trying to write the following sentence:

"There are some objectives we cannot miss in any visualization library, which are: performance: high-level abstraction may limit the user’s ..., debugging: trial and error is a fundamental part ..."

I kinda feel I have improper use of the colon "which are:" since I have a second colon describing the performance in "performance: high-level ..."

I have checked this proposed approach. However, I have no suggests of how to apply it on my case.

  • 1
    Is a real bulleted list out of the question? – Andrew Leach Jun 24 '18 at 21:23
  • Oh no, not a bulleted list. I mean the regular English list in writing (i.e. Countries are: USA, Canada, and KSA). – Andrew Naguib Jun 24 '18 at 21:25
  • What I meant was, a bulleted list would easily allow a colon in each entry. Is that not possible here? Otherwise, you may need to consider dashes. – Andrew Leach Jun 24 '18 at 21:27
  • Oh, gotcha. No, it is not really possible. Would you please illustrate how are dashes may be used? – Andrew Naguib Jun 24 '18 at 21:29
  • 1
    Is it not possible to write this as a short paragraph? It seems like a lot of information for a single sentence. I would keep your sentence as a simple list 'which are: performance, debugging...'. Then follow up with a paragraph that defines those terms, one sentence for each keyword. Italicize the keywords in the paragraph body to remind the reader that you are making a list of important definitions. – bogle Jun 25 '18 at 4:45
1

The best course of action is probably a bulleted list, which will easily allow a colon in each entry:

There are some objectives we cannot miss in any visualization library, which are:

  • performance: high-level abstraction may limit the user’s ...,
  • debugging: trial and error is a fundamental part ...

However, if that's not possible, then dashes might be a possibility:

There are some objectives we cannot miss in any visualization library, which are: performance —high-level abstraction may limit the user’s ...; debugging — trial and error is a fundamental part ...

Note the use of semi-colons to separate the list entries, which is a standard use. Within each item, you can then use "lesser" punctuation like dashes or commas (although commas aren't suitable in this particular case because they create something akin to a run-on sentence).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.