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In the passage Lesson 13 from "400 Must-have words for the TOELF" by McGraw-Hill, there is a sentence that I don't understand.

"According to legend, his arrogance invoked the wrath of God, who condemned the lost crew members to battle the waters off the Cape of Good Hope for eternity.

I'm wondering that to battle the waters off is equal to to fight the waters off or it's just a typo and supposed to be to battle the waters of the Cape of Good Hope

I tried to google "battle off" but I got very limited results, not sure if it's correct.

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    I think it is. . to battle the waters, off the Cape of Good Hope. To battle: to fight (a person, army, cause, etc.): We battled strong winds and heavy rains in our small boat. dictionary.com/browse/battle – user240918 Jun 18 '18 at 18:33
  • What does "off the Cape of Good Hope" mean? Does it equal "of the Cape of Good Hope"? – Louis Tran Jun 18 '18 at 18:42
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    Off here means, at a distance from... - OFF preposition (AWAY FROM) dictionary.com/browse/battle – user240918 Jun 18 '18 at 18:44
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    Regarding the use of "off": The "Cape of Good Hope" refers to the peninsular land mass at the southern tip of S. America. The waters that surround this area are the waters "off the Cape of Good Hope." – UserEpsilon Jun 18 '18 at 18:53
  • Or perhaps a land mass at the southern tip of Africa. – will m Jun 19 '18 at 23:19
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"Off" in this case refers to the crew's position in the ocean near the Cape of Good Hope.

It could be equivalently phrased as,

According to legend, his arrogance invoked the wrath of God, who condemned the lost crew members to battle the waters by the Cape of Good Hope for eternity.

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