0

I'd like to ask you about some phrase that I bumped into, and it is: is depended upon by

So, when someone says A is depended upon by B, what exactly does it mean?

  1. that A affects B (where A is independent)
  2. that B affects A (where B is independent)

I'm asking purely from linguistic perspective (the phrase can be seen in a tool for software development, and it causes misunderstandings, so I'm wondering if it's me who just understands it wrong).

  • "A is depended upon by B" means (B needs A or B depends upon A). So I would say that this is 1. that A affects B (where A is independent) and 2. that B affects A (where B is independent) is for "B is depended upon by A" (A needs B) – aesking Jun 14 '18 at 10:53
1

It is B that depends on A. In this relationship A affects B and A is independent.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.