0

Why would "which","that", and "and" be omitted in the following sentence:

That these skills are transferable across professions (which/that/and) makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students.

4
  • 3
    The question really is why would you want to include them? The declarative content clause "That these skills are transferable across profession" is subject and "makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students" is predicate. But you cannot insert a relative pronoun or "that", in a non-relative construction. And the coordinator "and" is used to link independent clauses, which is not the case here.
    – BillJ
    Jun 6 '18 at 7:36
  • Effectively it has been moved to the beginning of the sentence. Compare: These skills are transferable across professions, which makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students. Jun 6 '18 at 7:42
  • Compare with "The transferability of these skills across professions makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students"; contrast with "It is the fact that these skills are transferable across professions which/that makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students". Jun 6 '18 at 8:39
  • 1
    The addition of any of those words where you suggest they be added would make the sentence ungrammatical. Jun 6 '18 at 15:54
2

None of those:

That these skills are transferable across professions [] makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students.

It's essentially the same as if you had said:

The fact that these skills are transferable...

0

The only one of those that you might possibly grammatically include would be "that," but only if preceded by a comma or dash as follows:

That these skills are transferable across professions, that makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students.

or

That these skills are transferable across professions – that makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students.

Using a comma or a dash before "that" would make it a left dislocation in which the added pronoun "that" is defined by a phrase to the left of the clause in which it appears.

Otherwise, you would use none of those words because all of them make what is otherwise a grammatical sentence ungrammatical. To be clear, the following is a perfectly grammatical sentence:

"That these skills are transferable across professions makes them especially beneficial to twenty-first century students.

I believe the crux of the issue you're having is you aren't seeing the that-clause (i.e., "that these skills are transferable across professions") as a noun and the subject of the verb "makes." Maybe you don't think that that-clauses can be nouns (or, more specifically, noun clauses), but they can. See the following link for proof and for a more complete explanation with examples:

https://www.englishgrammar.org/thatclause-noun-clause/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.