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Is there a phrase that would describe it being more difficult to comprehend someone's misunderstanding of an idea or concept, once you yourself have understood it?

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  • It sounds like a confusion between habitual (or learned) knowledge and self-evidence. It reminds me of the phrase "familiarity breeds contempt." Except that, here, it's more like "familiarity breeds detachment." Jun 1, 2018 at 19:09
  • Your link gives a 'page not found' notification. Have you kept the illustrative text or can provide another example?
    – Paul
    Aug 31, 2018 at 21:02
  • @Paul, edited question to remove link as the question appears to have been deleted Sep 3, 2018 at 11:53
  • Something like “I don’t understand why you do t understand”?
    – Lawrence
    Sep 4, 2018 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

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You could say ‘unconscious competence’.

https://medium.com/the-philosopher-s-guide-to-startups/unconscious-incompetence-ad5583abf646

  1. Unconscious incompetence — when you’re doing something wrong and you don’t know you’re doing it wrong

  2. Conscious incompetence — when you’re doing something wrong but you know you’re doing it wrong

  3. Conscious competence — when you’re doing something right but you have to consciously focus on doing it the right way

  4. Unconscious competence — when you’re doing something right and you don’t even have to think about it

(And, in 4. You have forgotten the steps you took to learn it).

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