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When I was reading an article in a medical magazine of the George Washington University, I ran across a sentence in the article that:

"Brugmann says her relationship with Moody is one of the most important in her career."

As far as I know, "one of the" should be followed by a noun or a phrasal noun, so the above sentence would be written as " ... is one of the most importance in her career", or "... is one of the most important things in her career". I think that "one of the most important" is still incomplete, but a writer of a prestige university magazine hardly makes a basic grammatical error like that. I don't know the structure "one of the + an adjective" (without a noun) is still grammatical or not. I hope everyone can explain to me. Thank you!

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  • It's perfectly fine as originally quoted.
    – Hot Licks
    May 30, 2018 at 1:05
  • The non-compartmentalized might prefer "of her career".
    – Phil Sweet
    May 30, 2018 at 3:36
  • See the complete sentence. Better still, the whole broader context. The fragment is grammatically correct in that it references back to something said earlier.
    – Kris
    May 30, 2018 at 5:43
  • The noun being referred to is her relationship with Moody. (The most important relationship in Burgmann's career was the one she had with Moody.) May 30, 2018 at 6:13

1 Answer 1

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The quote implies, "...one of the most important (ones/relationships) in her career"

Why?

If a noun can be understood from context, it can be omitted if used in a later reference if modified by a comparative or superlative adjective: https://eslbase.com/grammar/comparative-superlative

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  • How and why? How do we know?
    – Kris
    May 30, 2018 at 5:43
  • 1
    If a noun can be understood from context, it can be omitted if used in a later reference if modified by a comparative or superlative adjective: eslbase.com/grammar/comparative-superlative May 30, 2018 at 5:59
  • 2
    That is the thing that ought to go into the answer.
    – Kris
    May 30, 2018 at 6:09

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