0

Which of the following two sentences is correct?

A: The training course will give the opportunity for the teachers to enhance the understanding of emotional intelligence.

B: The training course will give the opportunity to the teachers to enhance the understanding of emotional intelligence.

Where the difference between both of them is the 8th word (for and To).

closed as off-topic by Dan Bron, jimm101, AmE speaker, Kris, J. Taylor May 30 '18 at 17:26

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I would prefer 'The training course will give an opportunity to the teachers to enhance their understanding of emotional intelligence.' – Michael Harvey May 29 '18 at 16:49
  • No, but my question is why not "for the teachers" ? – Ghanem May 29 '18 at 16:51
  • Please look up the words in a good dictionary. See also English Language Learners – Kris May 30 '18 at 6:17
1

Though it looks like a matter of changing one word, in fact the two sentences have different structures. It happens in this case that there is no real difference in the meaning, but that will not always be so.

With for, "the teachers" goes with "opportunity", so:

... gives [to somebody unspecified] [an opportunity [for the teachers to ...]]

With to, "the teachers" goes with "give", so:

... gives [to the teachers] [an opportunity [for somebody unspecified to ... ]]

0

To show a transfer, you would say you are giving an opportunity to the teachers. Think of it as "giving to" vs "giving for". Couched differently, to show purpose, you could say the "the training course provides an opportunity for the teachers". Here's another version that contrasts both: The training course will give an opportunity to the teachers and provide critical information for their understanding of emotional intelligence.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.