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Travelling around the world for tourism and business gave me the chance to meet many people in developing countries. When I hear about their lives in their home countries, I can relate to their desire for better lives.

Should keep the first two "their"s, as I have bolded.

P.S is it better to say "Travelling around the world for both tourism and business" ?

  • @kanne The correct (and only) British spelling of travelling is with two ls. Other countries, such as Canada, can also spell it with two ls. – Jason Bassford May 26 '18 at 5:57
  • Why do you think that using their twice is ungrammatical, or otherwise wrong? – Jason Bassford May 26 '18 at 5:59
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    @JasonBassford I think it sounds abit ridiculous to use their so repetitively in one sentence. – A6ftMan May 26 '18 at 6:13
  • I've no problem with the three their's: such common words tend to be backgrounded. More jarring is the repetition of lives. And the tense mismatch. – Edwin Ashworth May 26 '18 at 7:37
  • @A6ftMan Fair enough, then don't repeat it. If you don't like how something sounds, then rephrase it. :) But this the discussion around this will be more opinion based than anything else. – Jason Bassford May 26 '18 at 15:23
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Repetition is a problem in writing. (unless it's poetry or writing in a creative way, like Doctor Seuss.)

When I hear about their lives in their home countries, I can relate to their desire for better lives.

I would replace one of the "their" like this: "When I hear about their lives and home countries, I can relate to their desire for better lives."

Also, "Travelling around the world for both tourism and business" Does sound better.

I hoped I helped.

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