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I'm finding it difficult to phrase this, but I'm sure there's a "law" or bias which says that we'll believe what we read in newspapers and so on about other fields despite reading bad reporting about our own field.

Anyone know what I mean?

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  • Besides who misreporting things in your own?
    – Lambie
    May 21 '18 at 19:21
  • @Lambie I think it refers to things like mainstream news reporting.
    – thosphor
    May 21 '18 at 19:25
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    Sounds like you're a state of congnitive dissonance; your behavior (believing what you read) is in conflict with your ideas or knowledge (about less-than-trustworthy reporting)
    – Gnawme
    May 21 '18 at 21:17
  • You're being unclear. Cognitive dissonance, as mentioned by Gnawme, refers to not believing stuff which conflicts with your own preconceptions. (It doesn't make much difference whether the conflicting "reporting" is "good" or "bad" in terms of accuracy.) I'm not aware of any term for believing other stuff about other fields to be "good" even when we "know" that reporting in our own field is "bad".
    – Hot Licks
    May 21 '18 at 21:48
  • One of the answers to that duplicate question refers to the Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect
    – user184130
    May 21 '18 at 23:32
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don't believe everything you read

Why You Believe Most Everything You Read or Watch on TV (a psychology article). One article's take on this subject:

So, what happens within our minds and emotions that make us receptive to lies, and then resistant to information that exposes the truth? A study led by Stephan Lewandowsky of the University of Western Australia explains part of what may happen. The researchers found that "Weighing the plausibility and the source of a message is cognitively more difficult than simply accepting that the message is true — it requires additional motivational and cognitive resources."

You have cognitive skills in your own field and can possibly filter such 'news'. In other fields it to too much work to discern the truth ... your mind more easily accepts the 'news' as true.

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