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Situation 1: Two men are running at a playground. A asks B "How long have you been running?"

Situation 2: B is in the habit of running a long way every day. Can A ask B the same question as above instead of "How long have you doing this sort of running?"

  • If in [2] B is no longer running, the question rapidly defaults to the 'How long have you been running 10 miles a day (etc)?' sense. Otherwise, "How long did you do today?" etc would be asked. In [1], the ambiguity is less easily resolved. Further context (such as have B and A met say for the previous three days, but not yet chatted?) is key. – Edwin Ashworth May 16 '18 at 10:19
  • thanks for your help. but I've never seen "How long have you doing this sort of running?" Did u mean "have you been doing?" – Ace Ace May 16 '18 at 15:16
  • It's grammatical if clumsy, but your original was much worse. "How long have you been running 20 kilometres a day" (etc) is what I'd expect. – Edwin Ashworth May 16 '18 at 16:58
  • yes, thanks very much, could you answer me another question – Ace Ace May 16 '18 at 17:30
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It depends on the nature of the relationship between A and B. If A and B are running buddies and A happens to find B that particular day at the playground already running and he would like to know for how long his friend has been at it A can then ask B, "How long have you been running?". If A and B are running buddies and A wants to know for how long B has been doing a certain style of running that day, for example a jogtrot or sprint, A can ask B, "How long have you been doing this sort of running?" If A and B have just met one another for the first time and A would like to know more about B's running habits then the questions: "How long have you been doing this sort of running?" or "How long have you been running?" would both be correct.

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