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I have found the perfect expression but I can't use it!

Is there any other way to say the same thing as:

hit the ground running?

I need to describe a tool that helps you learn stuff super fast, think Matrix and kung fu, when neo loads kung fu skill to his brain instantly

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  • Percuss the soil while locomoting. – Hot Licks May 14 '18 at 18:15
  • Possible duplicate of a closed question, english.stackexchange.com/questions/438522/… – Xanne May 14 '18 at 19:23
  • Hard to know if the key request here is "skill into his brain instantly" and whether it was really "sense of full-on practical experience" in the other rather than "hit the ground running" which was in the title of both and perhaps slightly off for both. @Xanne – Tom22 May 14 '18 at 19:29
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Here are a few idiomatic phrases that imply a quick start to a continued action in slightly different ways.

Jump-start ( this is about starting a car and perhaps more about "re-starting" so perhaps not perfect)

Leap into ( perhaps implies getting into an action already in a dynamic state)

Dive in ( perhaps more about 'immersion' and sink or swim than forward momentum, although "diving start" might be hit another)

"bootstrap" is a different concept of 'self starting' 'picking oneself up by one's own bootstaps" was the old idiom which turned into a computing term which was a sort of start up protocol where the initial steps loaded additional functions which in turn could be used to get a full suite of functions for an operating system going.

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    From Merriam-Webster, one meaning of jump-start is "to start or restart (something) rapidly or forcefully · advertising can jump-start a political campaign." So, it's appropriate. A close synonym is kick-start. – Jason Bassford May 15 '18 at 3:43
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be raring to go TFD

To be eager and ready to take action.

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A tool that gives you a crash course in [whatever]:

a rapid and intense course of study; also : an experience that resembles such a course · has been given a crash course in diplomacy in his first weeks in office

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