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Could you please tell me what the meaning of "to make a point" is in this case:

It’s three in the morning, and we are making our way from southern to northern Utah, when the weather changes from the dry chill of the desert to the freezing gales of an alpine winter. Ice claims the road. Snowflakes flick against the windshield like tiny insects, a few at first, then so many the road disappears. We push forward into the heart of the storm. The van skids and jerks. The wind is furious, the view out the window pure white. Richard pulls over. He says we can’t go any further. Dad takes the wheel, Richard moves to the passenger seat, and Mother lies next to me and Audrey on the mattress. Dad pulls onto the highway and accelerates, rapidly, as if to make a point, until he has doubled Richard’s speed.

Extract from Educated by Tara Westover

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  • 'Dad' is in effect 'saying' that the weather conditions should not prove all that difficult for a proficient driver; in fact, a decent driver could manage a much higher speed despite the conditions. // I'm with Richard. May 11, 2018 at 9:34

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Dad pulls onto the highway and accelerates, rapidly, as if to make a point, until he has doubled Richard’s speed.

"to make a point" usually refers to bringing forward a good argument (point) or an idea in a conversation.

Here, "Dad" accelerates rapidly as if he wanted to point out that this weather is not all that bad for a proficient driver.

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