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  1. The fact that you are here is an indication of your good intentions

My analysis of the clause in bold is Noun-clause/Adjectival/Post-nominal modifier. However, my teacher's answer is slightly different. He said that the clause in bold is Noun-clause/Nominal/Post-nominal modifier

  1. The dress that Melissa is wearing was designed in Paris.

However, in the sentence above, my teacher said that the clause in bold is Noun-clause/Adjectival/Post-nominal modifier

My questions are: What is the difference between the Noun-clause in the first sentence and the second sentence? Both of them modify the preceding noun, so what makes the first one "Nominal"?

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    "That you are here" is a declarative content clause functioning as complement of "fact". Some people call it a noun clause, but that is a misnomer. "That Melissa is wearing" is a relative clause modifying "dress". Content clauses function as complements while relative clauses function as modifiers. – BillJ May 8 '18 at 13:01
  • @BillJ is right. – Greg Lee May 8 '18 at 13:36
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As per the Towson University Online Writing Support,

In sentence 1 of the OP, the clause in bold is a Nominal Clause as appositive of fact, and that acts here as an expletive. A similar example sentence is here:

The fact that you are here is reassuring to me.

In sentence 2, the bold part is an adjectival clause describing the subject, The dress.

A similar example sentence:

A politician who is trustworthy has the support of the people.

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