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In this example, is the correct usage 'she' or 'her'?

Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot and her and Bron change places on the table. Chest compressions are tiring, so they switch to ensure they're maintaining the correct force and weight.

or

Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot and she and Bron change places on the table. Chest compressions are tiring, so they switch to ensure they're maintaining the correct force and weight.

Or are both correct?

Or are both badly worded generally? In which case, how would you word such a sentence?

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    Forget about everything before she and take that as the start. Should it be Her and Bron change places or She and Bron change places? If you can't answer that question, forget about answering this one. May 4, 2018 at 16:08
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    She... OMG, I feel like I'll be sent to the headmaster's office if I get this wrong!!! Do you cane students, John? ;)
    – GGx
    May 4, 2018 at 16:15
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    No, I try to amuse them instead. It's more fun. May 4, 2018 at 16:16
  • LOL... well, you did! Better than a caning any day! Thx!
    – GGx
    May 4, 2018 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

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Your construction is a compound sentence composed of two independent clauses:

Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot.

She and Bron change places on the table.

In the first clause Jenny is the subject; in the second clause "She and Bron" are the subject, so the pronoun would take the subjective case: she

Generally you would put a comma before the coordinating conjunction "and." The sentence would read, "Jenny administers the second high-dose adrenaline shot, and she and Bron change places on the table." Adding "then" to "and": "and then" would clarify the temporal aspect. If I understand the situation correctly,"at the table" might be a better choice.

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  • thanks! Super helpful. But, no, they are on the table, straddling the patient, giving compressions. Apparently, that helps maintain the correct force and weight! Thank you!
    – GGx
    May 4, 2018 at 16:19
  • @GGx Ah, I see. Definitely "on" the table.
    – Zan700
    May 4, 2018 at 17:20

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