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the renowned sprinter and track-and-field personality Carl Lewis, who had known pressure from fans and media before but never, even as a professional runner, this kind of pressure, made only a few appearances in races during the few months before the Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, partly because he was afraid of raising expectations even higher and he did not want to be distracted by interviews and adoring fans who would follow him into stores and restaurants demanding autographs and photo-opportunities, but mostly because he wanted to conserve his energies and concentrate, like a martial arts expert, on the job at hand: winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing home another Gold Medal for the United States, the most fitting conclusion to his brilliant career in track and field.

This is an excerpt of what is considered a good long sentence. I've started it at the main clause. I just wanted some basic clarification on the highlighted parts. The first bolded line- this kind of pressure- just doesn't sound right and wondered if it matters (I think it would sound better without it), and just in general what type of dependent clause would we class the last line after United States. It's dependent but what type is it.

  • "This kind of pressure" seems OK to me. It's an object of "known". The other bit in bold is a noun phrase functioning as a supplement, an additional and syntactically separate element. The head of the NP, "conclusion", has the preceding clause "winning his favorite competition, the long jump, and bringing home another Gold Medal for the United States" as its semantic anchor. – BillJ Apr 30 '18 at 18:17

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