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What does this sentence mean? "I want to do me. I'm going to do me."

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    Can you give any more context, such as where you saw this? Also, please don't include irrelevant images in your posts.
    – Laurel
    Apr 30, 2018 at 2:23
  • Not that long ago, "doing" meant having sex with someone. "I want to do her/him," meant that you wanted to have sex with him/her. In this light, "I want to do me,"means you want to have sex with yourself, not as self-gratification but as the other party. A form of narcissism, I suppose.
    – Zan700
    Apr 30, 2018 at 3:18
  • @Zan700 I think it goes without saying that the verb do has more than one sense.
    – user31341
    Apr 30, 2018 at 23:56
  • @jlovegren No it doesn't.
    – Zan700
    May 1, 2018 at 1:30

3 Answers 3

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While it's user based, Urban Dictionary has your answer. The phrase "doing me" refers to the speaker focusing on their own well-being.

"The act of taking care of yourself first. Making yourself happy. Not trying to please others."

I'd note that if you read the entries on the Urban Dictionary page I linked, only the first two are relevant.

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The context need not be specified. This is from a dialect of English used mostly in television screenplays. A young person is preparing for some kind of social situation (a date or an interview, for example), and their friend is telling them the different faces they can wear. Can you do serious? Can you do committed? Can you do heroic? After some soul searching, the hero realizes that they will be out of face if they try too hard to put on airs, and decides they will just behave normally.

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I want to be myself. I am going to be myself.

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