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What does the following sentence mean:

I then explained that I have spent two years each in Central America and Hong Kong writing and Reporting on...

  • Does it mean he spent one year in each location, or two years in each?
  • What is the grammar of "each" here?
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  • Where did anyone hear "I then explained that I have spent two years each in Central America and Hong Kong writing and Reporting on...", please? Not from a native speaker of British or US American English… At best, that would be “I had spent…” Is your “writing and Reporting” a simple typographical error or what? Will you explain how you think that passage could mean “one year in each” rather than what it said, ie, “two years in each”? Whether or not the difference between “one…” and “two years in each” is clear please, try asking the same Question at English Language Learners. May 9, 2018 at 20:41

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I believe “each” in this context means that he spent 2 years in one country, as well as 2 years in the other.

I think if he meant 2 years each as in 1 year per, he would have said 2 years “in both”.

It’s a gray area. This is just my interpretation. Best advice would be to consult the author directly.

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  • I agree. I also agree it could be expressed more clearly.
    – Zebrafish
    Apr 25, 2018 at 6:26

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