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Which is clearer: The customer made a tub selection and it is expected to arrive next week. or The customer made a tub selection that is expected to arrive next week.

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    It makes no difference. But why do you have to write “made a tub selection” and not just “selected a tub”? After all, what will arrive is not a selection but tub! – Tuffy Apr 22 '18 at 22:46
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The first phrase could work but, personally, I would probably turn it into two sentences. e.g The customer made a tub selection and it is expected to arrive next week. to The customer made a tub selection. It is expected to arrive next week. The second phrase would definitely need to be punctuated or slightly rephrased e.g. The customer made a tub selection that is expected to arrive next week. to The customer selected a tub, that is expected to arrive next week. I think that it should be "made a selection" (no object described) or "selected a ..." (specific object). You could take out selection entirely and use chose instead e.g. The customer chose a tub, that is expected to arrive next week. This would also give a more positive action to the choice, as the past tense of choose - the Oxford dictionary definition being "Pick out (someone or something) as being the best or most appropriate of two or more alternatives."

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"The customer selected a tub, which is expected to arrive next week." Then it's very clear that the "which" is referring to the "tub". I also like "which" better than "that" here because "expected to arrive next week" feels to me like a non-restrictive, subordinate clause.

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