1

This is the original sentence: "The guests reached the wedding party last night though it rained heavily." I transformed it to: "It rained heavily last night;however, the guests reached the wedding party." Is this correct?

closed as off-topic by AmE speaker, cobaltduck, aparente001, Drew, J. Taylor Apr 21 '18 at 9:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." – cobaltduck, aparente001, Drew
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Why do you want to transform the sentence? In my opinion the first version is preferable. – alan Apr 20 '18 at 16:32
2

I like to put context prior to subject matter when able. As such, my extrapolation of the sentence would be as follows: 'Despite heavy rainfall last night, the guests arrived safely for the wedding party.'

  • Upvoted because you included rationale. Seems to me that placement depends on which bit of information you want to emphasize, but in any case there should be some consideration as to why a given ordering of sentence elements is chosen. – tobybot Apr 20 '18 at 19:35
  • Actually, I want to ask if it is safe to put "last night" after "it rained heavily". – Midorikawa Katsumi Apr 21 '18 at 0:12
1

The first sentence is preferable, but if you would rather it be transformed you might say:

Though it rained heavily last night, the guests reached the wedding party.

Leave out the ";however,". Hope this helps.

  • Actually, I want to ask if it is safe to put "last night" after "it rained heavily". – Midorikawa Katsumi Apr 21 '18 at 0:12
  • Yes, it describes when it rained in addition to how it rained all in one clause. – user22542 Apr 21 '18 at 0:30
  • Despite its position in the first sentence? – Midorikawa Katsumi Apr 21 '18 at 0:33
  • I see your point. You could also say - Though it rained heavily, the guests reached the wedding party last night. It only depends on what you want to emphasize with phrase "last night" (raining or arriving). – user22542 Apr 21 '18 at 0:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.