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Anyone know the word you would use when you let something bad happen just to prove a point? "You're being _____."

For example, proactive would describe a situation where you attempt to prevent issues, reactive is where you respond after the fact. The word I'm looking for would be when an organization knows something bad could happen but allows it to prove a point or to teach a lesson. That organization could be said to be ______.

  • Negligent comes to mind. – lux May 28 '18 at 2:27
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One way to say that would be

You're cutting off your nose to spite your face.

This is a very common idiom, and well understood in all registers.

  • That's not it. I need the word to use in this situation: one person wants to let a computer crash so that the user learns a lesson. My response would be something like "We can't be ______, we need to educate them ahead of time..." – Keith Poss Apr 18 '18 at 14:04
  • @KeithPoss That gap could be spiteful, but that doesn't really fit with how I originally read the question. Please expand (edit) the question with more context of how you want to use this word. – TripeHound Apr 18 '18 at 14:07
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    For example, proactive would describe a situation where you attempt to prevent issues, reactive is where you respond after the fact. The word I'm looking for would be when an organization knows something bad could happen but allows it to prove a point or to teach a lesson. That organization could be said to be ______. – Keith Poss Apr 18 '18 at 14:10
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    @KeithPoss Those examples should go into the question. You can edit them into your question via the edit link just under your question. – Lawrence Apr 18 '18 at 14:19
  • Inactive has two forms; deliberate and negligent, and both can be considered as, Contemptuous and Dismissive. Snide/snidely works too - derogatory or mocking in an indirect way. Allowing people to make mistakes isn't always a rude or bad thing though. Some people need to learn by the direct consequences of their action/inactions. In which case they may be giving them the opportunity to find out how 'not' to do something. That does not align with 'proving a point' which is often a biased personal action showing contempt. – Norman Edward Apr 18 '18 at 14:41

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