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I was watching a video on a game developement company, and the person narrating the video said the following.

"That's about how many whole triple A titles might be in development at all of EA's major studios."

So my question is... what does be in development of mean?

It's quite a strange way of putting it, I would have said something along the lines of "might be in development at all by EA's major studios." But as I am a ESL speaker, I didn't want to jump to any conclusions and assume that a native speaker would be wrong.

Any help would be appreciated!

(Also I apologise for any formatting issues, I'm posting this from my mobile.)

closed as off-topic by lbf, David, jimm101, J. Taylor, AmE speaker Apr 20 '18 at 17:50

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You seem to be associating some of the words incorrectly. In particular, this part is causing some trouble:

...in development at all of EA's major studios

Based on your attempt to phrase your understanding, you tried to parse out "in development at all" as a unit, meaning "any development has happened", and then the subsequent "of" is unusual. Unfortunately, that isn't the correct association; "at all" is an English phrase, but not appropriate here. Instead "all of EA's major studios" is a single phrase for the participle "at". The meaning is essentially preserved by replacing that entire phrase with just "EA". Here's a simplified version of that sentence which loses some detail about certainty and precision, but is otherwise identical in meaning:

That's how many games are in development at EA.

Let me know if this shorter sentence is still unclear.

  • You're right, I'm dumb. I don't why this happens to me, but now that I've read the sentence back it makes perfect sense. Thank you very much for the help! – Vasu Apr 17 '18 at 19:04
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    @Vasu I don't think this makes you dumb, English is a weird language with very ambiguous rules about how parts of a sentence connect together. As an aside, the English that you've written here has all been excellent! – Kamil Drakari Apr 17 '18 at 19:26
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The part of the sentence "in development" is a prepositional phrase which actually complements the verb "be" and acts as an adjective which refines the noun "titles". The sentence could be rewritten thusly:

That's about how many whole triple-A titles in development exist at all of EA's major studios.

Here you can see better clarity by replacing "might be" with "exist". With the rewording, the phrase "in development" clearly defines the noun "titles". Furthermore, the phrases can be moved around a bit and we could bring back the auxilliary verb "might", but the original sentence is essentially in proper form.

  • So it's like... the main part is "That's about how many triple A titles of EA's major studios." and "in development exist at all" is a complement which acts as an adjective and refines the noun 'titles' so that it means that the 'titles' are in development? – Vasu Apr 17 '18 at 17:31

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