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A has 3 sweets, B has 4 sweets, C has 5 sweets. Is it correct if I say: "A has fewer sweets" or it must be "A has the least number of sweets"? I generally mean: are "fewer" and "more" used in group of more than 2 objects this way correctly?

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    Why wouldn't you want to use "fewest" in this context?
    – user888379
    Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 12:34
  • You might want to look at "countable nouns", too.
    – Pam
    Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 14:05
  • so what is the most natural way to express what I mean above? Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 1:41
  • The problem is it is unclear what you want to say. Do you want to say that A has fewer sweets than either B or C? Do you want to say that A has the fewest sweets in the group? Do you want to say that A has almost as many sweets as B? Are you asking if a comparative adjective can be used with more than two nouns? Yes, it can if you specify as I did previously. It's impossible to answer your request w/o knowing what you want to say.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 7:35
  • Would you like to know if the phrase is grammatical? Yes, it is.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 7:36

1 Answer 1

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A has 3 sweets, B has 4 sweets, C has 5 sweets. Is it correct if I say: "A has fewer sweets"

yes. Use "fewer" for things that can be counted, like sweets. It would be incorrect to use "more" or "less"

But if you said:

A has 3 cups of milk, B has 4 cups of milk, and C has 5 cups of milk

Then it would be correct to say that A has less milk than B. Even though you are counting cups, the actual thing you are counting is the amount of milk that each has.

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  • So how to say C has "more" sweets? I think it's just totally fine to use more this context? Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 1:37

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