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Which of the following sentences are most appropriate?

Hence, the teachers/educators need to look upon these points and further explore the child’s ‘behavior’; what the Psychologist call as the “Child Psychology.”

Hence, the teachers/educators need to look upon these points and further explore the child’s behavior; what the Psychologist call as the “Child Psychology.”

Hence, the teachers/educators need to look upon these points and further explore the child’s "behavior"; what the Psychologist call as the “Child Psychology.”

What is more appropriate: "behavior" or 'behavior'?

Kindly advice the correct phrase if it is none of the above.

Edit

Here is the complete paragraph I have written:

As the summer holidays are around in most of the schools, the teachers should take a break from regular teaching assignments and should try to understand improvement required with regard to some common issues faced by them, such as facing difficulties in dealing with children with special needs. Hence the teachers/educators need to look upon these points and further explore the child’s ‘behavior’ or what the Psychologist call as the “Child Psychology.” Child psychology basically deals with children’s attitude and behavior from pre-natal stage to adolescence stage. In this article we are going to explain aims & scope of child psychology along with its importance for a teacher.

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There is no correct answer to this without knowing the intent of the sentence.

Not using quotes at all is just fine if this is a descriptive sentence. (That's what it reads like to me. Unless there is something else going on before or after this sentence, quotes of any kind seem out of place.)

If the text is talking about the word behavior as a word, then either quotation style can be used.

Although double quotes are used in North America for quotations, single quotes can also be used in North America when referencing a literal word or phrase (not a quotation)—mostly in scientific texts or literary criticism.

However, the far more common way of referring to a word as a word is to put it in italics without any quotes.

Lastly, if the use of quotes here is to make a sarcastic type of remark (so-called "scare quotes"), then double quotation marks would be used for a North American audience. In the UK, depending on the style adhered to, it could be either single quotation marks or double quotation marks.

  • Thanks for your answer @Jason . I have added the paragraph where I am using the above sentence. – gpuguy Apr 17 '18 at 10:57
  • @gpuguy Seeing that, I see even less reason to put quotes around behavior. In fact, you don't need quotes around "Child Psychology" either. I would end with "the child's behaviour," and then start again with the "Child psychology basically" sentence. – Jason Bassford Apr 17 '18 at 15:23

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