1

What is the correct preposition that goes with the noun form "contrast"? I know we can say there’s a contrast "between" two items. Is anything else acceptable? Here’s the sentence I'm working with:

A resolution has been achieved, providing a clear contrast from where the journey started and now.

Is that okay? What about this: “... providing a clear contrast between the journey’s start and now.” Or maybe better: “ ... between the journey’s start and current phase.”

  • I'm a bit unclear about the question. Is this what you are trying to say? "A resolution has been achieved (or reached) as evidenced by the clear contrast between the journey's beginning and the journey now." – user22542 Apr 16 '18 at 23:50
  • Contrast can take to, with, and of as well as between. But the original sentence is confusing--is it a time comparison, a space comparison, or what? – Xanne Apr 17 '18 at 4:32
1

As far as contrast between goes, I would use phrasing similar to:

A resolution has been achieved, providing a clear contrast between the journey's start and its end.

Or you can use contrast with:

Now that a resolution has been achieved, the journey's end stands in clear contrast with its start.

Or you can use contrast to:

With the achievement of a resolution, the end of the journey stands in clear contrast to its start.


Note that I am using end. If the journey is not actually finished, then I would suggest current state or now.

Also, I haven't incorporated your use of where into my examples—I don't know if geographical location is an important aspect of what you're trying to convey or not. If it is, consider the location of the journey's start and either its final destination or its current location.

Hopefully this helps.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.