2

Following Martha's advise I am splitting up a question Compound sentences, the punctuation and mooore.

Consider the following fragment:

child nodes of a story representing its sub categories

I intended this fragment for anyone to understand that a story has sub categories, and these sub categories are displayed as child nodes.

  1. Is the relation between child nodes, sub categories and a story clear and unambiguous?
  2. How else could I construct the fragment so that it could be used as a subject of a sentence?

The story and the sub category are just terms, which may not make any sense to you but they do for those whom it's designated to.

  • 1
    The prefix "sub" is normally followed by a hyphen, or prepended without a hyphen or space, i.e. "sub-category" or "subcategory". – Steve Melnikoff Oct 27 '10 at 10:15
5

I would prefer

child nodes representing a story's sub-categories

or maybe something like

child nodes of a story representing this story's sub-categories

In your construction "representing" could refer back to "a story".

But more likely I would not use this phrase like this. Rather I would introduce child nodes in a dedicated sentence and refer back to the definition:

A story has sub-categories, and these categories are displayed as child nodes.

aforementioned child nodes or even only child nodes

  • The prefix "sub" is normally followed by a hyphen, or prepended without a hyphen or space, i.e. "sub-category" or "subcategory". – Steve Melnikoff Oct 27 '10 at 9:24
  • @Steve - thank you. Maybe direct this comment to the OP too? – malach Oct 27 '10 at 9:30
  • While more sentences almost always provides less ambiguity, comparing the question with his previous one (on making compound sentences), I believe that the first two examples would suit him better than the third. – stevendesu Nov 14 '10 at 17:12

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