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I am writing a software module that takes polygons and either inflates them or deflates them based on user input (i.e. if the user supplies 0.5 as input, the polygon is deflated to half of its size, whereas if they supply 1.5. it is inflated to 150% of its size). I'm having trouble naming this module, because I want it to be obvious what it does, but the only name I can think of (PolygonInflaterOrDeflater) feels like too much of a mouthful, even for software lexicon. Maybe a bit redundant, somehow, too... Anti-redundant, if that's a thing). Furthermore, there are other parts of the software that are named according to its function, such as attemptPolygonInflationOrDeflation which I feel suffer from the same problem. Is there a term that would obviously cover "Inflation" and "Deflation" simultaneously? I'm racking my brain and I can't think of one.

closed as off-topic by tchrist Apr 15 '18 at 18:57

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  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because our help center says that choosing names for things in computer programs is out of scope for our site. – tchrist Apr 15 '18 at 18:57
  • Well, when it comes to an umbrella you're either opening it or closing it. – Hot Licks Apr 15 '18 at 18:59
  • 'Enlargement'. This is defined using scale factors less than one as well as greater than one. And even for negative scale factors. – Edwin Ashworth Apr 15 '18 at 19:03
  • Inflation and deflation are changes in the value of money. – Xanne Apr 15 '18 at 22:40
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    @EdwinAshworth Quite so, including tires, ego . . . – Xanne Apr 15 '18 at 22:50
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Resize. A polygon is two-dimensional and both inflation and deflation suggest 3-dimensions. Resize covers everything, even n-dimensions. So, in pseudo-code:

Polygon1.Resize(0.5); // Deflation
Polygon2.Resize(2.3); // Inflation

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