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Has anyone ever heard of the phrase, "that is something above discussion"?

It came to mind today, but I couldn't find anything over the Internet. Maybe it sounds like that, but is something else, in fact, the way the words of a song can go misheard.

The meaning I expected it would be is when something has been decided out of another's reach.

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It's sounds like you've misremembered beyond dispute:

impossible to disagree with

The main part of his argument was beyond dispute.

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2

nondebatable or non-debatable: not able to be debated.

[collinsdictionary.com]

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it's beyond recall TFD

impossible to change, reverse, retrieve, or restore.

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If A is above B (discussion in this case), typically in a specific context, it means that there is no scope of using B on A. This is like discussion (in the sense of debate) is not encouraged on a gospel which is an established/respected notion (especially within specific contexts).

ODO:

above
PREPOSITION
2.2 Considered of higher status or worth than; too good for.

‘She wants her actions, inactions, and mistakes to be above any legal reproach.’

MW:

above
preposition
2 b : out of reach of
'above suspicion'

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  • Beyond dispute is not what I was looking for, but it is a good substitute. There is a slim chance I used to use this expression not knowing it was a false translation; or was just not putting it right. – Plume Apr 13 '18 at 22:15
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I think the idiom you were thinking of is

out of the question

If something is out of the question, you are saying it is totally unacceptable and it is
not up for discussion, the speaker is categorically affirming that the request is impossible to meet and it is unthinkable that it will be permitted. It translates the Italian idiom "fuori discussione" which a poor translator tool might have translated it as: out = above or out of discussion.

It is out of the question for a twelve-year-old to go to a nightclub!

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