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Which statement is correct?

This figure does not appear in either textbook.
OR
This figure does not appear in either textbooks.

  • 1
    The first one is correct. Either + singular. – Qian Chen Apr 12 '18 at 6:11
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In the above examples, "either" is used as a definite determiner (more specifically, a definite disjunctive determiner) to indicate two possibilities.


From Cambridge Dictionary's English Grammar Today:

Either referring to two choices or possibilities

We can use either as a determiner before a noun to talk about two choices or possibilities. The noun that follows either must be a singular countable noun:

  • Personally, I don’t like either jacket.

  • Not: … I don’t like either jackets.


Think about it this way: what we're actually talking about is one set that is the union of the two options.

On the other hand, "either of" can be followed by a plural noun, so it would be acceptable to say:

The figure does not appear in either of the textbooks.


Cambridge Dictionary's English Grammar Today:

Either of

Either must be followed by of if we use it before the, these, those or possessives (my, your) with a plural noun:

  • Either of the children can come with us; we don’t mind which.

  • I don’t want either of my parents to know I’ve lost my job.

  • Not: I don’t want either my parents

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