0

This question already has an answer here:

Should I use "which" or "that" in these sentences. I appreciate they are virtually the same sentence. I don't think it makes a difference here but I speak/write British English (not American English).

  1. The twin room has its own ensuite that/which is equipped with a shower.

  2. This stylish room has its own ensuite which/that is equipped with a shower.

Thanks

marked as duplicate by choster, J. Taylor, AndyT, Rob_Ster, JJJ Apr 11 '18 at 15:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

0
  1. The twin room has its own ensuite, which is equipped with a shower.

  2. The twin room has its own ensuite that is equipped with a shower.

These sentences are not the same. The first sentence tells us that there is only one twin room, and it is equipped with a shower. The clause which is equipped gives us additional information, but it doesn’t change the meaning of the sentence. Remove the clause and the info would still be clear: The twin room has its own ensuite with a shower.

The second sentence suggests that we have multiple twin room, all ensuite with shower.

But on the other sentence, This stylish room has its own ensuite which is equipped with a shower.

  • Please comment on your additional use of the comma in the first instance. – Stan Apr 10 '18 at 13:27
  • @user292594 your interpretation of the second sentence is not right. Where is the suggestion that there is more than one twin room? Maybe you are thinking of these two examples: "The room which has a shower is [somewhere] " versus "the room, which has a shower, is [somewhere]" in which the meanings are distinct in a somewhat similar way to that which you are suggesting. – JeremyC Apr 10 '18 at 16:26