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Which one is correct?

  1. I have missed the bus and then, I also missed the plane.
  2. I have missed the bus and then, I also have missed the plane.

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, JJJ, AmE speaker, Phil Sweet, J. Taylor Apr 16 '18 at 9:35

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1

Then is hardly ever followed by a present perfect. The GloWbE corpus has 38000 instances of "then I [verb-ed]" but only a few hundred of "then I have [verb-ed]", (if you exclude "Since then I have [verb-ed]").

So any combination of tenses with then and a perfect after it is unlikely.

I find the collocation of then and also awkward: either is fine, but both together seems unnatural to me.

A perfect in the first part followed by a simple past in the second (with or without then) is unlikely, because the perfect implies that the missing the bus is in some way relevant to the present, but the missing the plane is over and done with. That is possible in the slightly unlikely case of

I have missed the bus, and I also missed the plane.

which would imply that missing the plane happened earlier, and there is probably no causal connection between them.

Patterns which I would find normal are:

I missed the bus and then I missed the plane.

I missed the bus and I also missed the plane.

I have missed the bus and I have also missed the plane.

I missed the bus and I have also missed the plane.

0

You can combine the verb tenses, but you can't conjoin a past perfect clause with another clause as you have. (It's really the use of "then" that is tripping you up.)

In short, neither of your example sentences is correct.

There are several correct versions that don't mix verb tenses:

  • I have missed the bus and the plane. [This is correct, but a single clause.]
  • I have missed the bus and I have (also) missed the plane. [This is correct, but not commonly expressed in such a fashion.]
  • I missed the bus and then I (also) missed the plane.

Because of how "then" functions (as a continuation of action) it is incompatible with the past perfect (which expresses something already completed). But if you don't use it, and you rearrange the sentence, you can correctly mix the verb tenses:

  • I have missed the plane because I missed the bus. [In this form, you can't use "also" because it wouldn't make sense to do so.]

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