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Is there any English equivalent for the Chinese proverb “悶聲大發財” (He who keeps silent makes a fortune), which implies that in order to be wealthy and successful you must stay low and mince your words ?

  • Quiet achiever carries some of that idea, but quietness isn't a condition there - it just happens to be a quality of the achiever. – Lawrence Apr 6 '18 at 8:27
  • Shut up and get rich. – Hot Licks Apr 6 '18 at 12:22
  • Is this what you tell adult film stars before an election? – Jim May 7 '18 at 1:30
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This has to do with reward, not wealth. And I'm also not sure it works, but it's what popped in my head:

the meek shall inherit the earth.

Different wordings are found in different bibles:

New American Standard Bible
"Blessed are the gentle, for they shall inherit the earth.

Christian Standard Bible
Blessed are the humble, for they will inherit the earth.

The meaning understood from this line may vary among popular culture, biblical scholars and so forth, but I did find one meaning at dictionary.com:

The saying implies that those who forgo worldly power will be rewarded in the kingdom of heaven.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy

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This doesn’t explicitly include the “be wealthy and successful” / “make a fortune” / “make big money” aspect, but an idiom for “keep quiet, stay low and mince your words” is keep your head down.

Macmillan Dictionary:

    to continue doing something quietly, especially when there is trouble happening around you
    I have got to keep my head down and play it as it comes.

the Cambridge English Dictionary:

    to avoid trouble:
    He’s in a bad mood today – I’m just keeping my head down.

The Free Dictionary:

    To actively avoid conflict or attention.
    I’m keeping my head down at work these days because I don’t want to be among the layoffs that are sure to accompany our recent change in leadership.

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This doesn’t explicitly include the “be wealthy and successful” / “make a fortune” / “make big money” aspect, but an idiom for “keep quiet, stay low and mince your words” is don’t rock the boat.

The Free Dictionary:

    Don't say or do something that could upset a stable situation.
    None of my family members are fighting with each other right now, so please don’t rock the boat by bringing up politics or any other controversial topics.

Idioms Online:

    To rock the boat is to do something which causes trouble or upsets a stable or desirable situation.
    • My supervisor is very abusive but I just got a big raise and I don’t want to rock the boat.
    • I really don’t want to rock the boat, but I think someone should say something about Rob’s behavior.

Urban Dictionary:

    “rocking the boat” means stirring up trouble.  To rock the boat means to disrupt things, promote disharmony, make waves, pick a fight, causing trouble, disagreement...

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