0

I read an article from Wall Street Journal by chance this morning. There was a sentence in it, "When an agreement to protect the Dreamers is reached, it will be despite this president rather than with his leadership." (by Andrew Ackerman)

I didn't get it from the first sight. I know "A rather than B" means "A but not B", so this sentence's meaning should be "When an agreement to protect the Dreamers is reached, it will be despite this president but not with his leadership." I am not sure how I should translate "it will be despite this president" to another expression.

Thanks in advance for any help.

  • "A rather than B" means "A and not B" or "A instead of" B" ... rather than "A *but not B". "A but not B" suggests that "A and B" could have been possible; "A rather than B" indicates that they are alternatives. – Green Grasso Holm Apr 3 '18 at 14:35
  • Thanks for pointing it out. I am still confused with the combination of "despite" and "rather than". – Word Digger Apr 3 '18 at 17:05
0

The context is that one might hope or expect that the president would lead the way to an agreement. But, in reality, not only is President Trump not leading the way, he isn't even cooperating. Therefore, if others do manage to reach an agreement, it will be despite (that is, in spite of) his lack of cooperation. Does that help?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.