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Is it right to say like "year one thousand anno Domini"? I have found it on the internet.

closed as off-topic by tchrist Apr 1 '18 at 3:23

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You can find a lot of things on the Internet that aren't necessarily right. Not everyone on the Internet is a literate native English-speaker.

I think the answer you are looking for is, in spoken language, "in [the year] one thousand A D", which would be written as 'in [the year] 1000 AD". Yes, AD does stand for Anno Domini, but it is almost always pronounced as just the two letters. The full expression is very rarely used nowadays. It might perhaps be used to give historical "flavour" to some work of fiction set in the past.

There is a politically correct tendency to replace AD with CE (standing for Common Era), which I personally find rather ridiculous.

  • 'You can find a lot of things on the Internet that aren't necessarily right.' That's why answers on ELU are required to be supported by authoritative references. If this is too simple to need such, it's too simple for ELU. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 31 '18 at 19:33

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