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"The store's design familiar if generic, like a miniaturized Whole Foods." I understand every word of the sentence, but still the meaning is not clear. The sentence is quoted from an American newspaper and it's about the new Amazon store in Seattle.

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, Bread, Skooba, Community Apr 2 '18 at 14:48

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  • Use citations and/or show your research in your question, if you please. – lbf Mar 31 '18 at 14:35
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    Either you've mistranscribed the text, or it hasn't been proofread. It seems to me there's a verb such as is / seems / looks missing before familiar, and a comma missing after it. – FumbleFingers Mar 31 '18 at 15:04
  • Related: adjective + if + adjective – Andrew Leach Mar 31 '18 at 15:26
  • "The store's design is familiar (if one wished to be unkind, one might even say generic), like a miniaturized Whole Foods." I don't think 'familiar' and 'generic' are disjoint enough to use 'familiar if generic'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 31 '18 at 15:47
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If this is a sentence, it should read: "The store's design is familiar if generic, like a miniaturized Whole Foods."

Or it could be a sentence fragment: "The store's design, familiar if generic, like a miniaturized Whole Foods..."

Either way, "familiar if generic" means that it's familiar, but also generic. It looks like other stores we're familiar with, but doesn't evoke anything in particular and lacks distinctiveness.

  • Use citations in answers, if you please. – lbf Mar 31 '18 at 18:02
  • Sorry! It's a typo. "The store's design is familiar if generic, like a miniaturized whole Foods." – Michiko Apr 1 '18 at 15:25

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