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I need to translate a Turkish idiom. Literal translation is "It is neither a festival nor a special day. So why did my brother-in-law kiss me?", which is used for unusual events seemingly without a causal relationship, but there is something behind it.

  • The expression 'high day or holiday', which obviously corresponds closely to your Turkish expression, used to be a lot more common in the UK than it is today. But most people would understand what you meant if you said 'It was neither a high day nor a holiday. So why did my brother-in-law kiss me?' Though they'd probably not identify with the custom. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 31 '18 at 13:23
  • so basically you want an idiom: why did he kiss me? – lbf Mar 31 '18 at 14:29
  • I suspect it is a rhetorical question and not a request for an explanation. Like saying "is it my birthday" when a several good fortunes happen in quick succession. The OP might want to include an actual example of the situation where this would be used. – Phil Sweet Mar 31 '18 at 15:01
  • may we see the idiom and how you translated it to English? – lbf Mar 31 '18 at 16:12
  • Here it is: twitter.com/ahmetnesin_Eng/status/980184219329683456 – murat Mar 31 '18 at 20:47
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This idom may work: no rhyme or reason TFD

A total absence of a reasonable or rational explanation for something.

  • This doesn't address OP's requirement 'which is used for unusual events seemingly without a causal relationship, but there is something behind it' but slinging in an 'apparently without' rectifies that. +1 in anticipation. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 31 '18 at 16:09

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