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I'm looking for a word that describes the backward, dependency between items that must be completed in a specific order, one after another.

"A series of interdependent tasks."

Is there a word that is more specific than interdependent? I don't want to imply that multiple tasks might depend on multiple other tasks. I also don't want to imply that two or more tasks might share dependencies between themselves at the same time. Only one task at a time has dependency on its prerequisite and the dependency relationship only goes in one direction.

  • I would simply suggest "A necessarily sequential set of tasks", as opposed to "a necessary set of tasks". – WS2 Mar 29 '18 at 21:26
  • It is NOT an answer. I'm not sure what kind of tasks they are , but I would suggest considering follow-on tasks or chain tasks or chain-kind-of tasks. – haha Mar 29 '18 at 22:17
  • chain tasks? Are those task performed by a chain? [ha ha] – Lambie Mar 29 '18 at 23:23
  • Probably :) .... – haha Mar 29 '18 at 23:54
  • Is the interdependence what you want to express, or would the sequential nature do? Compare assembling a watch (task dependency) with mowing a series of lawns (only time dependency). – Lawrence Mar 30 '18 at 0:18
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The Oxford Reference has 'sequentially dependent task'.

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You can use subsequent

As in, set of subsequent tasks.

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in succession from succeed dictionary.com

To come next in time or order; the coming of one person or thing after another in order, sequence, or in the course of events:

As in:

"A set of tasks done in succession"

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List has a very precise meaning in mathematical or computer science domains, which seems to apply here.

Would a ”a list of tasks” make sense?

In computer science, a list or sequence is an abstract data type that represents a countable number of ordered values, where the same value may occur more than once. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_(abstract_data_type)

This is in contrast with a set which has no order.

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Procedure : A series of actions conducted in a certain order or manner.

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