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I'm looking for an abbreviation or single word which functions just like the abbreviation "cc'd", except explicitly refers to someone who is in the To: field of an email, and not the CC: or BCC: field.

For example:

To: michael.scott@dundermifflin.com, scrantonbranch@dundermifflin.com

CC: nybranch@dundermifflin.com

We're bring in Michael Scott (cc'd*) as the new manager of the project.

*Except the cc'd in the above sentence would be replaced with the word/abbreviation I'm looking for--because Mr. Scott is not cc'd, he's included as a primary receiver of the email.

This question is concerned with how to, "convey the idea that someone's email address is in the box named "Cc" ". It is similar, but does not address the preferred way to address someone that is in the To: field as opposed to the CC: field.

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    Well I would fix it by putting them in the CC box – Azor Ahai Mar 29 '18 at 21:30
  • If "cc'd" works in the first place, what would be wrong with "to'd", please? Don't they follow - or break - the same rules? – Robbie Goodwin Apr 13 '18 at 15:35
  • The people in the "To:" field are addressees. – Hot Licks May 1 '18 at 21:53
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I’d rephrase since it seems weird (potentially rude) to refer to someone in the to: list in the third person.

If he is not addressed in the e-mail then cc: not to: list seems correct, and your question disappears.

Perhaps something like :

Hi folks,
We have some changes planned etc etc

Michael - We're bringing you in as the new manager of the project.

Peter- you will need to assist Michael to ...

[Perhaps this should be a comment not an answer!]

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You might use the acronym RCPT, which means recipient, this is according to The Free Dictionary (note that the acronym has some other listed meaning as well).

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