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I've been looking for a common word for image and video frames but I could not come up with anything other than picture. But I am not sure if picture really refers to video frame.

The word image refer single picture, to refer a single image in a video, the term a video frame is used.

I'm writing a paper, and I am constantly saying an image or a video frame. For example, "We extract the noise of an image or a video frame to do ..."

What is a better word for those?

  • A frame is just one type of image, ultimately, so you might be best saying something like "We extract the noise of an image, which could be a digital photograph or a single frame from a video, for example". – Max Williams Mar 26 '18 at 12:29
  • @MaxWilliams, makes sense, I need to define it first at one point and use it. But still image seems a nice term as @JeffUK proposed. I think best way is the combination of the two: ` "We extract the noise of a still image, which could be a digital photograph or a single frame from a video`. Thanks! – smttsp Mar 26 '18 at 12:42
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A still:

an ordinary static photograph as opposed to a motion picture, especially a single shot from a cinema film.

Still could be used on it's own if you're talking to videographers, although "Still Image" is clearer for everyone.

  • I like this word, you saved me from my struggle I've been trying to solve for the last few months – smttsp Mar 26 '18 at 12:43
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A video frame is an image. If I take several still images and make a video out of them, I haven't transformed the images themselves. Likewise, if I take one frame from a video and look at it in isolation, it's just an image.

The term movie is believed to be slang for 'moving picture', so picture would work too. But in an academic paper the term image sounds more appropriate.

The reader should be able to tell from context that the images you refer to could have come from a video or not.

  • A video frame is an image, I agree, but when people read the paper, they need to be able to understand. In my field, people are using the word specifically for an image not for a video frame – smttsp Mar 26 '18 at 12:46
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    Yes, I like JeffUK's answer here. I've read many computer vision papers written by non-native English speakers and I think it's great that you're going to this much trouble to get the language right. A lot of the corpus is nigh unreadable. – tjp Mar 26 '18 at 12:58

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