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On the website http://web.ku.edu/~edit/that.html, there is the sentence

"The senator said that he might run again and that, if he did, Myra Henry would be his campaign manager."

I don't think there should be a comma after the word "that":

The senator said that he might run again and that if he did, Myra Henry would be his campaign manager.

Which one is correct?

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    I'd not class either as unacceptable. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 25 '18 at 15:08
  • They're both fine; it's just a matter of style. – ruakh Mar 25 '18 at 15:12
  • But I feel, due to inserting "if he did", the commas are justified. – Ram Pillai Nov 7 '19 at 5:49
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I read it as a parenthetical element. 'if he did' could be removed from the sentence without changing the meaning. Some examples should make this clear (taken from http://grammartips.homestead.com/interrupters.html):

Take, for example, the way Linda responded to being accused of
bias.

That explanation, as I have already said, doesn't really hold water.

You should, nevertheless, continue your efforts despite this recent disappointment.

He cannot, however, hope to defeat a popular incumbent.

The italicised parts are parenthetical elements. They could be removed from the sentence and it would still read correctly.

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