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And what are other alternatives expressing that you personally don't like something?

Context:
"- Hey, you've been living in Berlin for 3 months already! How is your German?
- I didn't learn it much. I feel like it's not my language"

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, user240918, Nigel J, dwjohnston, Rory Alsop Mar 24 '18 at 13:08

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  • 1
    Can you give more context? What kind of situation are you imagining where you think you might be able to say this? If someone said "This fish is my favorite dish on the menu here", you could reply "it's not mine" (with stress on the word "mine" to emphasize that you are contrasting yourself with the other person), and this would be understood as meaning "it's not my favorite dish on the menu here". If someone asked "Do you like this fish?", it would not make sense to reply "It's not mine." – sumelic Mar 22 '18 at 17:22
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Two suitable idiomatic phrases I am aware of are it's not for me and it's not me.

The first case describes something as not conforming with the speaker's preferences. This is useful for the example like the one you gave:

Hey, you've been living in Berlin for 3 months already! How is your German?

I didn't learn it much. The German culture is not for me.

The second case can be used to say one is not "the type of person who would do that". (Another idiom that can be used here is "it's not who I am".) In an example like yours, it might be used like this:

Hey, you've been living in Berlin for 3 months already! How is your German?

I didn't learn it much. The German language is commanding and harsh sounding. It's not me.

(Apologies to Germanophiles!)

1

I think the expression you're looking for is not one's cup of tea. According to Cambridge Dictionary:

"If something is not your cup of tea, it is not the type of thing of that you like"1

Attribution 1 Not be sb's cup of tea Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved March 22, 2018, from https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/not-be-sb-s-cup-of-tea

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