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Based on Google Books Ngram Viewer here, here, and here, along with a quoted Google search, it seems that "for the best experience" is the more common phrasing, however "for best experience" seems quite common and seems to convey the same meaning. Is there a difference in meaning, usage, formality, or some other factor that would cause one to choose the one form over the other?

"You are using an outdated browser, please update for best experience."

vs.

"You are using an outdated browser, please update for the best experience."

  • Please give examples of these sentences, and explain how you arrive at 'It seems that "for the best experience" is the more common phrasing' and 'however "for best experience" seems quite common'. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 19 '18 at 14:09
  • as "for best experience" doesn't seem correct to me. you couldn't say "for best table" (i know it is a rubbish counter example) – WendyG Mar 19 '18 at 14:13
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    The second example is correct. I've seen the first example occasionally; it always seems to me that it's mimicking the style of headlines, where articles (especially the) are dropped. Not grammatically correct, but for some reason people like it for display text like this. Brevity, I suppose? – spoko Mar 19 '18 at 15:52
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    In your examples, dropping the article sounds like "headline-ese", which is somewhat common in computer messages. Including the article sounds more like ordinary English. – 1006a Mar 19 '18 at 15:52
  • @1006a Great minds think alike, apparently, and simultaneously! – spoko Mar 19 '18 at 15:53

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