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I'm writing a request letter to my and my sister's high school but I don't how to properly say it.

I, Rebecca Smith, would like to request a copy of my and my sister, Anna Smith's Transcript of Records.

or

I,Rebecca Smith, would like to request a copy of my and my sister's, Anna Smith, Transcript of Records.

if both are wrong, please tell me a better sentence and also, if something is wrong in this question, you can correct it. Thank you very much

marked as duplicate by tchrist Mar 19 '18 at 0:13

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  • There is no happy solution that involves an apostrophe. You have to reword. We have duplicates of this question. – tchrist Mar 19 '18 at 0:07
  • My problem here is adding the name of the sister. If there is no name, I think "my and my sister's records" is correct. But if you put the name there, it sounds wrong to me. "my and my sister's, Anna Smith, records" – Sayaka-chan Mar 19 '18 at 0:16
  • Yes, all those sound wrong. You need your transcripts and those of your sister. – tchrist Mar 19 '18 at 0:17
  • "I, Rebecca Smith, would like to request a copy of my records and my sister, Anna Smith's records." seems fine but sounds repetitive, doesn't it? – Sayaka-chan Mar 19 '18 at 0:21
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    If you write "I, Rebecca Smith, would like to request a copy of my and my sister, Anna Smith's Transcript of Records" as in question, there is a big risk that some stupid person will send you only Anna Smith's records. "I, Rebecca Smith, would like to request a copy of my records and my sister, Anna Smith's records" seems fine but sounds repetitive, doesn't it?" __ When you write to universities you must be extremely clear like that, even at risk of repetition. "A copy of my records and also my sister Anna Smith's records" would be a small improvement in the reading. – English Student Mar 19 '18 at 1:30