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"Along one wall stood a low chest so richly brown as to appear black". Is this sentence right? As I know a subject is always followed by a predicate but in this sentence, the predicate is followed by the subject.

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This sentence structure is called a locative inversion, where a prepositional phrase of location shifts to the beginning of the sentence and the subject and verb switch places. This creates a focus on the subject, which, as in this case, can be more easily and extensively modified.

Near the front door stood an old oak hatrack, now laden with winter coats, which Marjorie had inherited from her grandmother.

A stylistic alternative is to insert a dummy subject there after the prepositional phrase:

Near the front door there stood an old oak hatrack, now laden with winter coats, which Majorie had inherited from her grandmother.

This restores at least nominally the usual subject-verb order.

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