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Do these sentences make sense?

"X is a food trade show which took place from the 4th to the 7th November 2013"

"the international congress was held from 22nd to 24th October 2015"

What are the other alternatives? The different ways with which I can express the same concept but with different methods. Like, dunno, is "from November 4 to November 7 2013" acceptable, FOR INSTANCE?

Thanks to everyone!

2 Answers 2

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Yes, that's acceptable. Though if you use "November 7 2013", you must put a comma after the 7 to differentiate the date. "November 7, 2013."

"X is a good trade show which took place from November 4th to November 7th in 2013."

"X is a food trade show which took place from the 4th to the 7th of November in 2013."

"X is a food trade show which took place from November 4th to 7th in 2013."

"The international congress was held from the 22nd to the 24th of October in 2015."

ETC.

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As Heather's answer states, using "from [date] to [date]" is quite correct, and is probably how I would write such things.

Another way you could write a date range is using from ... through [to]:

The Winter Olumpics took place from the 9th of February 2018 through [to] the 25th [of February]

(Where I'd probably omit the second of February if the two dates are in the same month, but include that part if the range straddled two or more months).

As a Br.E speaker, I would tend to use through to, although my impression is that in Am.E it would be more common/acceptable to use just through (or, in less formal contexts, thru).

Finally, I would probably only use this form for longer periods of time, as in my example. I probably wouldn't use it for your examples which are all only a few days. Whether there is a basis for this distinction, or it's just an idiom I've picked up, I'm not sure.


From sense 4 of Merriam-Webster: through:

—used as a function word to indicate a period of time: such as
a: during the entire period of: all through her life
b: from the beginning to the end of: the tower stood through the earthquake
c: to and including: Monday through Friday

See also thru for the alternate spelling.

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