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I have this sentence:

Although Christmas season is in summer in Australia, many Australians...

What I'm not sure about is the in Australia part. It's an adverbial, isn't it? An adverbial of place can be switched between the beginning and the end of the sentence, so is my sentence grammartically correct? Thank you.

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  • Your sentence is grammatically correct. – Santosa Sandy Mar 9 '18 at 13:27
  • Does it have the same meaning when I switch in Australia part to the beginning (in Australia, Christmas season is in summer...)? – Tùng Mar 9 '18 at 13:30
  • I wouldn't gamble that ' An adverbial of place can be switched between the beginning and the end of the sentence' is sound for all sentences. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 9 '18 at 14:37
  • I would argue that it's modifying "Christmas season". – Hot Licks Jun 8 '18 at 2:05
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In my opinion, your sentence is grammatically correct.

However, if you switch the "In Australia" part to the beginning of the sentence, you can not join the following subject into one sentence.

It would be:

In Australia, Christmas season is in summer. Many Australians...

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  • So that means I can't use the although word? And my sentence is correct right? Because you type is, so I don't know you means is or isn't? – Tùng Mar 9 '18 at 13:45
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    You can have "Although, in Australia, Christmas season ...". – Green Grasso Holm Apr 8 '18 at 23:35

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