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Is there a idiom, saying, proverb for if anything and everything (ideology, news, gadget, media, game or sports, etc) is over-sensitized (continuously spotlighted/too familiarize in public eye) then people become insensitive/lose interest/the idea, news... lose value.

  • one word might be "overhyped". – J. Taylor Mar 2 '18 at 10:22
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When everything is loud, nothing is loud. That is, constant stimulation leads to exhaustion, not interest or focus. This saying seems to get closer to your nuance that "anything and everything" (rather than a single overhyped or overexposed topic) is being thrust at the public.

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This definition of overexposed matches your requirement exactly:

a situation in which someone or something appears so much in newspapers, on television, on the radio etc that people lose interest

More idiomatically, you can say that an idea has been done to death.

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There is a part-duplicate, but the adage familiarity breeds contempt is relevant here.

From ODO:

familiarity breeds contempt [phrase] proverb

Extensive knowledge of or close association with someone or something leads to a loss of respect for them or it.

Examples from YourWebdesignShop.com:

Can saying something over and over make it more credible and common sensical? Or was Aesop right in the Fox and the Lion fable when he famously declared that familiarity breeds contempt?

and Billboard...1954:

His second point is that TV has given credence to the axiom that "familiarity breeds contempt", by over-exposure with a resultant lessening of the welcome by the audience.

[slightly re-formatted]

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I'm not sure if this is what you have in mind, but things that are very common are often said to be "a dime a dozen".

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What goes up must come down.

Definition: Things that rise also fall.

This expression is often used to say that something good will not last forever.

From writingexplained.org

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