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Is the below statement correct? If not, how should I say it?

Please let me know when and where can I meet you on Friday.

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    Please let me know when and where I can meet you on Friday. Transposing 'I' and 'can' resolves this difficulty and makes it into a statement.
    – Livrecache
    Feb 27, 2018 at 6:49
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    A statement is not a question. It's as simple as that. Feb 27, 2018 at 6:55

2 Answers 2

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You could split it into two sentences, "Can I meet you on Friday? Please let me know when and where." This separates the question from the request but does assume that the answer to the question is affirmative.

To be absolutely correct you would need something like "Can I meet you on Friday? If so please let me know when and where." However people would normally accept the implied 'if so' in the first version.

You could also make it into two questions, "Can I meet you on Friday? Can you let me know when and where please?". Although this might sound a bit needy.

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  • You do not need to know if they CAN meet you. So all of the first parts of your questions are irrelevant. Feb 27, 2018 at 23:52
  • @TarynLambert Yes you do. If the other person is in another city, on holiday, in previously booked meetings or otherwise unavailable any discussion of times and venues on that day is meaningless. If the answer to 'Can I meet you on Friday?' is 'No' the next question becomes 'Then when can we meet?'
    – BoldBen
    Feb 28, 2018 at 13:53
  • No, you don't. It says "on Friday". Obviously, this implies that they can meet you on Friday, but the person needs to know when and where. Feb 28, 2018 at 21:51
  • @TarynLambert The question has been edited since I answered it, I believe that it's no longer the question I ansewed.
    – BoldBen
    Mar 1, 2018 at 22:43
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No. When you say Please let me know when and where can I meet you on Friday, You are in no way asking a question. You can make it into multiple sentences to make it into a question though. Or just one by saying,

Can you please let me know when and where I meet you on Friday?

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  • ... when and where I can meet you...
    – Jim
    Feb 27, 2018 at 22:56
  • @Jim Uhhhh.... what? Clarify, please. Feb 27, 2018 at 23:50
  • You have "when and where can I meet you"...
    – Jim
    Feb 27, 2018 at 23:51
  • Yeah... so? Don't see the problem with that... Feb 28, 2018 at 0:13
  • In my book that inversion is incorrect in a statement- it's only used in questions.
    – Jim
    Feb 28, 2018 at 0:34

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